Facts About Africa:

  • Africa is the second biggest continent on Earth.
  • Africa is the second most populous content, home to roughly 12 percent of all humans or 840 million people.
  • Cairo is the largest city with over nine million inhabitants.
  • The largest country in Africa is Sudan.
  • The coastline of Africa is 18,950 miles long.
  • The longest river is the Nile with a length exceeding 4,150 miles.
  • The Nile is the longest river in the world.
  • Lake Victoria is the largest lake in Africa and feeds the Nile.
  • Africa has eight percent of the world’s oil reserves.
  • Africa produces nearly 50 percent of the gold in the world.
  • Africa produces 50 percent of the diamonds in the world.
  • The largest mountain is Mount Kilimanjaro at over 19,317 thousand feet.
  • With over 11 million square miles of land, it accounts for 5.7 percent of the Earth surface and over 20 percent of the total land surface of the earth.
  • The Sahara Desert is the largest in the world.
  • The Sahara is more than 3.5 million square miles in size.
  • Africa was connected to South America millions of years ago before the tectonic plates moved away from each other.
  • Africa is currently moving slowly in a northeast direction.
  • The Romans termed the continent “Africa Terra”, which evolved into Africa.
  • Africa is the place where humans first existed.
  • Fossil remains show humans existed in Africa over 4 million years ago and perhaps as long as 7 million years.
  • The first recorded dominant civilization in Africa was the Egyptians in 3,300 B.C.
  • Egypt remained the dominant culture until 343 B.C.
  • Phoenicians established Carthage in the north around the 9th century B.C.
  • Romans conquered the Phoenicians in 146 BC and ruled much of North Africa until the 4th Century A.D.
  • Arabs put their mark on Africa starting in the seventh century A.D. and spread Islam throughout the country.
  • In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, European powers began to dominate and eventually colonize much of Africa.
  • In the mid to late twentieth century, most African nations gained independence.
  • Africa is currently considered the poorest continent on Earth.

There are 53 countries in Africa:




www.factsmonk.com/facts_about_africa

LOCAL RESOURCES:
Boston has an African-American Museum:
http://www.afroammuseum.org/events.htm

The NAACP--the oldest organization supporting rights for African-Americans, was founded in Boston. The oldest chapter is still active:
http://www.bostonnaacp.org/

Boston University has an African Studies center that does outreach to K-12 Schools:
http://www.bu.edu/africa/outreach/

Brandeis also has an African and Afro-American Studies program:
http://www.brandeis.edu/departments/afroamerstudies/


Teranga, 1745 Washington St. Boston, 617-266-0003 A well-reviewed Boston-based Senegalese restaurant. Request food for teachers’ luncheon?


Ugandan North American Association Waltham is home to 10,000 Ugandans, according to a Boston Globe article from 2009. I am looking for contact information for Frank Musisi, the community leader mentioned in the article. There is a clothing store on Moody St. that might help us locate community members who’d come visit the kids in traditional dress…
Grade One Curriculum

Key projects/experiences for Grade One with focus on Africa
  • Visit from parent or community member with direct experience (and artifacts) from an African country
  • Read aloud stories and reading logs throughout the year featuring African folktales, picture books set in Africa, non-fiction books about Africa, and stories featuring African-American characters and cultures
  • African folktale study using stories such as Rabbit Makes a Monkey of Lion; Princess Gorilla and a New Kind of Water; Village of Round and Square Houses; A Story, A Story
  • During December, research African-American celebration of Kwanzaa
  • Study of Martin Luther King Day using appropirate texts, such as My Brother Martin and Martin's Big Words, A Picture Book of Martin Luther King Jr.
  • Study of Harriet Tubman using Minty and other biographies to talk about themes of cuorage, loyalty, friendship
  • Science research projects classifying animals by "feathers, fur, scales, and shells" heavily focus on animals from Africa
  • Students write a book about deserts that emphasizes plants and animals that have adapted to this biome, focus on Sahara desert during this project


Reading
  • Chooses an African folktales, picture books set in Africa, non-fiction books about Africa, and stories featuring African-American characters and cultures and reads independently in a sustained way
  • Reads African folktales, picture books set in Africa, non-fiction books about Africa, and stories featuring African-American characters and cultures with accuracy and fluency to support comprehension on a first grade level.
  • Monitors reading of African folktales, picture books set in Africa, non-fiction books about Africa, and stories featuring African-American characters and cultures using a variety of strategies to understand text (predicting, making connections, generating questions, summarizing, visualizing, inferring, drawing conclusions)
  • Retells a story about Africa or African animals in sequential order with details
  • Responds to or discusses higher level questions related to the text on Africa

Writing
  • Understands and incorporates the writing process when completing projects on Africa and African animals
  • Participates in shared research and writing projects on Africa and African animals

Language
  • Incorporates punctuation, capitilization and standard English conventions in writing assignments on Africa and African animals
  • Spells words using phonetic and spelling rules in projects on Africa and African animals


History and Social Science Curriculum (based on monthly curriculum guides K-12, Waltham Public Schools):

Basic Wants and Needs:
· Coming to America—story of immigration to the U.S. is often a story of people coming here to be able to meet basic needs

Map Skills:
· Show where Africa are in relation to the the other continents. Use these in discussions of cardinal directions, north pole, equator
· Show differences in climate across Africa
Comparative Cultures:
  • Kwanzaa or New Year celebrations could be a way to show students differences among cultures using a celebration that is familiar to many American students
  • Students could also look at how African music, food, art, and other cultural aspects have been integrated into the American culture.

Folktales:
· In-depth study of African folk-tales (see booklist for ideas)

Science Frameworks:
Life Science:
· Grades preK-2: identify the ways in which an organism’s habitat provides for its basic needs -- use animals from specific habitats to demonstrate this
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Key projects/experiences for Grade Two with focus on Africa
  • Visit from parent or community member with direct experience (and artifacts) from an African country.
  • Include books for read alouds and reading logs throughout the year featuring African folktales, picture books set in Africa, non-fiction books about Africa, and stories featuring African-American characters and culture.
  • Study of Martin Luther King Day using appropriate texts, such as My Brother Martin and Martin's Big Words.
  • Black History Month study of African-American "achievers" such as Harriet Tubman, Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King Jr., Sojourner Truth, Ruby Bridges, Jackie Robinson, David Ortiz, Jesse Owens, Mae Jemison, Eloise Greenfield, Matthew Henson
  • Animal study with focus on animals from habitats throughout Africa that focus on how animal's habitat influence their development. It will also focus on endangered species and conservation programs in Africa.


Reading
  • Kids will choose books about Africa to read aloud and independently in a sustained way.
  • Monitor reading of books about Africa including African folktales, picture books set in Africa, non-fiction books about Africa, and stories featuring African-American characters and cultures using a variety of strategies (predicting, making connections, generating questions, summarizing, visualizing, inferring, drawing conclusions)
  • Retells a story about Africa in sequential order
  • Responds to or discusses higher level questions related to the text on Africa


Writing
  • Understands and incorporates the writing process when completing projects based on Africa and animal habitats in Africa
  • Participates in shared research and writing projects on Africa and animal habitats in Africa.

Language
  • Incorporates punctuation, capitilization, and Standard English Conventions in writing and research projects on Africa and animal habitats in Africa.
  • Spells words in writing assignments on Africa and animal habitats in Africa using phonetic and spelling rules

History and Social Science Curriculum (based on monthly curriculum guides K-12, Waltham Public Schools):

Maps and Globes:
  • Use Africa in discussions of basic directions, continents, oceans
Discuss National Origins:
  • Coming to America theme can be used to show that each student has a background that shapes our culture; students can look on map and identify where their countr(y, ies) of origin are and find out when/how their families came to America with emphasis on traditional food, customs, sports, games and music of students’ nationalities
  • Read alouds can tie into this discussion to present specific stories of immigration (e.g., Lilly and Miss Liberty by Carla Stevens; Coming to America by Betsy Maestro; Molly’s Pilgrim by Cohen; When Jessie Came Across the Sea by Amy Hest; Marianthe’s Story by Aliki)
Study of Achievers—people who can make a difference:
  • Discussion of important African heroes:
  • Discussion of important events in African history: Settlement by English


Science Frameworks:

Life Science:
  • Grades preK-2: identify the ways in which an organism’s habitat provides for its basic needs; use animals from specific African habitats to demonstrate this
Grade 3 Curriculum Frameworks:

Key projects/experiences for grade 3 with Africa:

  • Visit from parent or community member with direct experience (and artifacts) from an African country.
  • Include books for read alouds and reading logs throughout the year featuring African folktales, picture books set in Africa, non-fiction books about Africa, and stories featuring African-American characters and culture.
  • Biography book report that focuses on African-Americans
  • In studying Massachusetts history, focus on key African-American heroes from our state (e.g., Phillis Wheatley, Crispus Atticus, William Trotter, Edward Brooke), and discuss Massachusetts' role in the abolitionist movement (e.g., Alcott Thoreau, Emerson, Massachusetts' 34th Infantry regiment, role of W.E.B. Dubois at Harvard) during Black History Month
  • In studying biomes and animal adaption, use Africa as a continent of focus for temperate, savannah, rainforest and desert biomes

Reading:

  • Chooses a book on Africa inlcluding African folktales, picture books set in Africa, non-fiction books about Africa, and stories featuring African-American characters and culture and read them independently in a sustained way.
  • Reads frican folktales, picture books set in Africa, non-fiction books about Africa, and stories featuring African-American characters and culture with accuracy and fluence to support comprehension on a third grade level.
  • Monitors reading of African folktales, picture books set in Africa, non-fiction books about Africa, and stories featuring African-American characters and culture using a variety of strategies to understand text (predicting, making connections, generating questions, summarizing, visualizing, inferring, drawing conclusions)
  • Responds to or discussed higher level questions related to texts such as African folktales, picture books set in Africa, non-fiction books about Africa, and stories featuring African-American characters and culture
  • Retells a story about Africa or African biomes in sequential order with details.

Writing:
  • Understands and incorporates the writing process when completing assignments on Africa and African biomes
  • Participates in short research and writing projects on Africa and African biomes

Language:
  • Incorporates punctuation, capitilization, and Standard English Conventions in writing pieces about Africa and African biomes.
  • In writing assignments on Africa and African biomes spells words using phonetic and spelling rules

Social Studies:

Waltham history:

  • Coming to America—how was Waltham shaped by arrival of various immigration groups and how does Waltham continue to be shaped by immigration; use recent immigration experiences of students at Plympton School and refer to information in Waltham Rediscovered by Petersen
  • · North American immigration: using local immigrants as experts, explore immigration patterns from European countries to Waltham and North American culture in the city
  • · Study the flags of Africa (see lesson in "Around the World Through Holidays" by Carol Peterson-available in Plympton Library

Science:

Earth and Space Science:
  • Weather: Explain how air temperature, moisture, wind speed and direction, and precipitation make up the weather in a particular place and time. Distinguish among the various forms of precipitation; discuss global weather patterns; differentiate between climate and weather
  • Use Africa as locations to compare climate of specific biomes
  • Rock and soil formation: : Explain and give examples of the ways in which soil is formed, using examples in Africa

Life Science:
  • Animal and plant structure and functions: Differentiate between inherited characteristics of plants and animals and those that are affected by the climate or environment
  • Use distinct climates and environment of different African regions to show animal and plant adaptations
  • Adaptations of living things/migration: give examples of animals that migrate to adapt to changes in environment


Grade Four Curriculum Frameworks


Key projects/experiences for Grade Four with focus on Africa:


Include books for read alouds throughout the year featuring African folktales, picture books set in Africa, non-fiction books about Africa and stories featuring African-American characters


  • Immigration project: use African and African-American experts and examples in immigration Glog project

U.S. Regions: Discuss African-American settlement in the U.S, including slavery, the Great Migration and 21st century African immigration to the U.S.


Impact of African-American culture on American literature, art, music, science, sports, movies



Integration of African and African-American Culture into Waltham Curriculum:


(based on Outline of Curriculm Benchmarks for Grade 5, Waltham Public Schools)


Reading/Language Arts:


  • Books chosen for independent reading and classroom discussions can be from African and African-American cultures
  • Genre studies can include examples of poetry, historical fiction, realistic fiction, informational texts, biographies, and traditional literature from African and African-American cultures
  • Open response questions could address issues of justice for African-Americans or response to a story from this culture

History and Social Science Curriculum:



Map skills, landforms, natural resources:

  • Highlight the land forms and natural resources found in Africa as examples; Find these locales on the map


Themes of Geography—nation of many people, immigration

  • Coming to America—in-depth exploration of how and why people immigrate to the United States; incorporate anecdotal and fictional accounts to expand understanding using reading list developed by school library teacher
  • Use African experts and examples in grade 4 immigration project


United States Geography and Regions:

  • Discuss American settlement in the U.S., including how culture influences regional culture; impact U.S. culture in literature, art, music, science, sports, movies

Science Frameworks:



Earth and Space Science:

Weather:

  • Explain how air temperature, moisture, wind speed and direction, and precipitation make up the weather in a particular place and time
  • Distinguish among the various forms of precipitation; discuss global weather patterns; differentiate between climate and weather
  • Use African locations to compare climate of specific biomes


Rock and soil formation:

  • Explain and give examples of the ways in which soil is formed; use examples from Africa


Life Science:

Animal and plant structure and functions:

  • Differentiate between inherited characteristics of plants and animals and those that are affected by the climate or environment
  • Use distinct climates and environment of different African regions to show animal and plant adaptations (e.g., desert animals vs. rainforest animals)


Adaptations of living things/migration: give examples of animals that migrate to adapt to changes in environment

  • · Use example of species that migrate from one African region to another

Grade Five Curriculum Benchmarks

Key projects/experiences for Grade Five with focus on Africa

Include books for read alouds throughout the year featuring African pictures or facts, and stories featuring African and African-American characters and culture (see booklist)


Social Studies: Include history of slavery in discussion of American Colonization; role of African-Americans in the Revolutionary War; Inclusion of African-Americans in founding documents (especially Constitutiion)


Weather project--compare climate of Africa to that of U.S. in terms of weather disasters and reading a weather map



Integration of African and African-American Culture into Waltham Curriculum:

(based on Outline of Curriculm Benchmarks for Grade 5, Waltham Public Schools)

Reading/Language Arts:

Reading:
  • Books chosen for independent reading and class discussions can have African-American themes

Writing:
  • Informational writing could be tied into research about the role of African-Americans in early history of the Americas and the United States

History and Social Science Curriculum:


Exploration and Colonization of the Americas:
  • Slave Trade during time of exploration and early colonization
  • Settlement patterns based on slave holdings (e.g., New England settled differently from Southern plantations)

Revolutionary War and Founding of the United States
  • Share stories from African-American vantage point (e.g., Chains by Laurie Halse Anderson, War Comes to Willy Freeman by James and Lincoln Collier)
  • Look at place of African-Americans in writing US Constitution (e.g., count as 3/5 of person; compromise between northern and southern states)

Science Frameworks:

Earth and Space Science:
· Weather:
  • Explain how air temperature, moisture, wind speed and direction, and precipitation make up the weather in a particular place and time
  • Distinguish among the various forms of precipitation; discuss global weather patterns; differentiate between climate and weather
  • Global weather patterns--look at natural disasters common in Africa and compare to US; read an African weather map

· Rock and soil formation:
  • Explain and give examples of the ways in which soil is formed
  • Use expansion of Saharan Desert as means of talking about importance of soil and erosion

Life Science:
· Animal and plant structure and functions:
  • Differentiate between inherited characteristics of plants and animals and those that are affected by the climate or environment
  • Use distinct climates and environment of different African regions to show animal and plant adaptations

KENYA


Some Kenyans follow Christian celebrations. Some Kenyans follow Muslim celebrations.


Spring:

Safari Rally - sports cars race all around Kenya.

Easter


Summer:

Madraka Day - anniversary of self government

Mombasa Agricultural Show


Autumn:

Kenyatta Day – anniversary of Jomo Kenyatta’s arrest by the British in 1952

Malindi Fishing Festival


Winter:

Jamburi – Independence Day

Christmas


Traditional African Celebrations:

  • Piercing of ears – Children have outer edge of ears pierced with they are 4 or 5 years old. Lobes are pierced around 10 years old.
  • Initiation
  • Eunoto
  • Marriage
  • Elder – Before the eldest child is born, parents go through a 2 day cleansing ceremony to become elders
  • Senior Elder – Senior elders carry a staff made of a sacred tree and a bunch of leaves. Then can now administer justice.
  • Dignified Elder – Dignified elders wear special brass earrings.


Muslim Festivals

  • Id – Al-Fitri – marks the end of Ramadan. They celebrate with feasting and prayers in the mosque.
  • Id – Al- Adha – Marks Abraham’s willingness to sacrifice his son, Isaac.
  • Maulidi Al Nebi


Kikuyu and Eunoto – coming of age ceremonies for boys and girls


Graduations: when young men become warriors


Resource (in the Plympton Media Center): Festivals of the World: Kenya 394.2 Kag


NEW YEARS DAY IN AFRICA


Since Africa is a continent that contains different countries, New Year’s Day is celebrated in a variety of ways and at different times of year.

  • Ethiopia: September – torches are lit, flowers gathered, songs sung, wishes for good luck, bath in river to wash away old year, feasting
  • Yams are in abundance in western Africa and are served in many feasts.
  • Muslim New Year: prayers in mosque. Several new year celebrations mark changing of seasons.
  • Cape Town: January 1 Carnival - In late 1800s blacks were slaves to white settlers in Cape Town. January 1 was the only holiday granted to the slaves so they had carnivals to celebrate.


Resource (in Plympton Media Center): New Year’s Celebrations 394.26 WOR p. 40-41



African-American Celebrations:



Martin Luther King, Jr. Day: A major American holiday celebrating the contribution of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr to the Civil Rights Movement. Click on the "American Holidays" link on the left for lots of ideas about celebrating this holiday. The Plympton Library has many books about Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement.


Black History Month: In 1926, Dr. Carter Woodson proposed creating a week each year to bring attention to the contributions of African-Americans to U.S. History and Culture. This week has now become Black History Month, celebrated each February in the United States. The Plympton School Library has an extensive collection of books to support Black History Month, including winners of the Coretta Scott King Literature Award:

http://www.ala.org/emiert/cskbookawards/recipients

. Our school typically participates in the African-American Read In each year, sponsored by the National Council of Teachers of English, which encourages students to read works by African-American authors. See

http://www.ncte.org/action/aari/


Juneteenth: Juneteenth is a celebration of the ending of slavery in the United States. It recognizes June 19, 1865 when slaves in Texas were notified they were freed--two years after President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation freeing the slaves. Some ideas for sharing this event with students are here:

http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/calendar-activities/celebrate-juneteenth-20547.html

The Plympton Library has books about Juneteenth and about slavery in the United States.



Kwanzaa: This 45 year old African-American celebration designed by a professor of African Studies aims to celebrate 7 principles common in African culture, including:

  • unity
  • self-determination
  • collective work and responsibility
  • cooperative economics
  • purpose
  • creativity
  • faith

The holiday is typically celebrated in late December to correlate with harvest celebrations in several African countries. The official website for this holiday is: http://www.officialkwanzaawebsite.org/index.shtml#Welcome


Plympton library has several books about Kwanzaa

The Billy Bear website has ideas for crafts and games connected to this holiday:

http://www.billybear4kids.com/holidays/kwanzaa/kwanzaa.htm


Kindergarten
  1. Anansi character study
  2. Ezra Jack Keats author study
  3. Tanzania Alphabet safari
  4. Abiyoyo
  5. Two Ways to count to ten
  6. A is forAfrica
  7. Many Colors of Mother Goose- Cheryl Willis Hudson
  8. Of Thee I Sing- Barack Obama


1st Grade
  1. Kwanzaa study/activity
  2. Beatrice’s Goat
  3. African Dance
  4. The Talking Eggs
  5. Bringing the Rain to Kapiti Plain

2nd Grade

  1. The Day Gogo Went to Vote- Sisulu
  2. Jenny Reen and the Jack Muh Lantern-Irene Smalls
  3. Stomp Out Loud
  4. Irene Smalls Author Study

3rd Grade
  1. Ebony Sea- Irene Smalls
  2. In the Time of the Drums- Siegelson
  3. Stomp out Loud
  4. Sundiata: Lion King- David Wisniewski

4th Grade/ 5th Grade
  1. Mufaro’s beautiful Daughters
  2. The Dark-Thirty- Paticia McKissack (Ghost Stories)
  3. John Henry- Julius Lester
  4. My America: Freedom's Wings- Sharon Wyeth

Black History Month
  1. Henry’s Freedom Box
  2. Ruby Bridges
  3. Martin Luther King
  4. Amazing Grace series
  5. In the Time of Drums- Siegelson
  6. John Henry- Julius Lester


Book List
Boundless Grace- Mary Hoffman
In the Time of the Drums- Siegelson
The Day Gogo Went to Vote- Sisulu
Sudiata: Lion King- David Wisniewski
Henry’s Freedom Box-
Ruby Bridges
Mufaro’s beautiful Daughters
The Dark-Thirty- Paticia McKissack (Ghost Stories)
Ebony Sea- Irene Smalls
Jenny Reen and the Jack Muh Lantern-Irene Smalls
The Talking Eggs
Bringing the Rain to Kapiti Plain- Verna Aardema
Beatrice’s Goat
Anansi character study- Eric Kimmel
Ezra Jack Keats
Tanzania Alphabet safari-
Abiyoyo- Pete Seeger
Two Ways to count to ten- Ruby Dee
A is for Africa- Ifeoma Onyefulu
My First Kwanzaa-
John Henry- Julius Lester
Talk, talk: An Ashanti Legend- Chocolate
Flossy and the Fox- Pat McKissack
Many Colors of Mother Goose- Cheryl Willis Hudson
My America: Freedom's Wings- Sharon Wyeth
Of Thee I Sing- Barack Obama
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Choosing an anthem: Jomo Kenyatta couldn't decide what song should be the Kenyan national anthem. He noticed that children had gathered around as he was listening to music. He decided to let the children decide the anthem. He played the music for them and they chose an African lullaby "Es Mungu Nguvu ytu" ("O God of All Creation.")

PLEASE GIVE THE MUSIC TEACHER 2 WEEKS NOTICE IF YOU WOULD LIKE HER TO INCLUDE ONE OF THESE SONGS IN HER CURRICULUM.
Let Your Voice Be Heard – Songs fromGhana and Zimbabwe. Includes CD A Brief Introduction toGhana- information about this country and a map
  • A Brief Introduction toZimbabwe- information about this country and a map
  • Game Songs – children learn about counting, morals, culture – lots of SYNCOPATION
    • Sorida
      • a greeting song
    • Kye Kye Kule
    • Oboo Asi Me Nsa
      • rock passing game – cooperation – asking grandmother for help
    • Sansa Kroma
      • story of Sansa the hawk who snatches baby chicks – an animals survival in the wild
    • Bantama Kro Kro
      • Bantama are pastries – call and response
    • Vamuroyi Woye
      • Name game, call and response game – African animal words
    • Pete Pete
      • call and response – pete means vulture


  • Story Songs (each song includes narrative story) – lots of SYNCOPATION
Storytelling is a vital and living art inAfrica. Preschoolers receive an informal, yet extensive, education as they participate in storytelling groups.
    • Zangaiwa Chakatanga Pano
      • The power of cunning over force
      • Part singing


    • Chatigo Chinyi
      • Victory of good over evil
      • ostinato


    • Chawe Chidyo Chem’chero
      • The power of cunning over force
      • Crops and animal predators


  • Recreational Songs: Since African tradition and history is most often passed on orally, participation in vocal activities is very important – lots of SYNCOPATION
    • Wai Bamba
      • wedding song – dancing encouraged – AABBAA form
    • Meda Wawa Ase
      • a lesson in contributing positively to ones society
    • Chiro Chacho
      • Wedding song – soprano, alto, tenor, bass voices (Zimbabwean weddings typically have 2 choirs. One for the bride and one for the groom.)
    • Wonfa Nyem
      • Song of mourning – SATB voices – Fulfilling one’s obligations to society
    • Kyerem
      • Bits of ancient wisdom – sung at funeral
    • Okwan Tsen Tsen
      • Resisting cultural change, intertribal disputes
    • Cho Kurima Woye
      • “Time of Starvation” inZimbabwebefore 1900


  • Creating the Sound
    • Master Musicians – Master musicians are revered in their community.
    • Bells, Gongs and Sticks
    • Rattles – percussion ensemble materials
    • Handclapping
    • Voices Fitting Together
    • Learning to Listen – spontaneous music making inAfrica


  • Glossary (of African terms, both musical and nonmusical)


AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSICIANS – great for biographies – Black History Month Duke Ellington
Wynton Marsalis
Bradford Marsalis
King Oliver
Dizzy Gillespie
Count Basie
Aretha Franklin – also good for Womens’ History Month

Books:
  • Abiyoyo by Pete Seeger. Illustrated by Michael Hayes. Scholastic. 1989. ISBN 0-590-42720-2 A giant comes to the village and a boy's music soothes the savage beast.
  • Bat Boy and His Violin - during the time of negro baseball leagues

In the Plympton Media Center
  • Lift Every Voice and Sing – combines artwork with the history of African American struggle in a song 782.4216
  • Shake It To The One That You Love The Best: Play Songs and Lullabies from Black Musical Traditions 782.7

African and African-American Artists:

Romare Bearden (1911–1988)

Bearden's art transcends categories because it joins the imagery of black life and circumstance to universally understood experience. This is the essence of Bearden's contribution.
http://www.nga.gov/education/classroom/bearden/bio1.shtm

Kara Walker

Kara Walker (American, b. 1969) is best known for her room-size tableaux of black cut-paper silhouettes that examine the underbelly of America's racial and gender tensions.
http://learn.walkerart.org/karawalker

.

El Anatsui

El Anatsui was born in Anyanko, Ghana in 1944. Many of Anatsui’s sculptures are mutable in form, conceived to be so free and flexible that they can be shaped in any way and altered in appearance for each installation.
http://www.pbs.org/art21/artists/el-anatsui

Glen Ligon

Glenn Ligon was born in the Bronx, New York, in 1960. Ligon’s paintings and sculptures examine cultural and social identity through found sources—literature, Afrocentric coloring books, photographs—to reveal the ways in which the history of slavery, the civil rights movement, and sexual politics inform our understanding of American society.
http://www.pbs.org/art21/artists/glenn-ligon

Kerry James Marshall

Kerry James Marshall was born in 1955 in Birmingham, Alabama, and was educated at the Otis Art Institute in Los Angeles, from which he received a BFA, and an honorary doctorate (1999). The subject matter of his paintings, installations, and public projects is often drawn from African-American popular culture, and is rooted in the geography of his upbringing:.

http://www.pbs.org/art21/artists/kerry-james-marshall

Julie Mehretu

Julie Mehretu was born in 1970 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Mehretu’s paintings and drawings refer to elements of mapping and architecture, achieving a calligraphic complexity that resembles turbulent atmospheres and dense social networks.
http://www.pbs.org/art21/artists/julie-mehretu

Arts and Crafts:


Metaphors and Meanings of House: African Painted House Traditions

Ndebele painted house
http://www.radford.edu/rbarris/art427%20African%20Diaspora/EIU%20African%20Art%20folder/paintedhouses.htm

11th graders take us on a tour of their village- painted homes and landscape

http://pbskids.org/africa/myworld/ngaka.html

Tribes and People Groups: Ndebele, crafts, culture, images

http://www.africancraftsmarket.com/Ndebele-people.htm

Traditional And Cultural East And North East African HomesRead more: http://www.bukisa.com/articles/365530_traditional-and-cultural-african-homes-part-2#ixzz1yFpqua10


East African homes, different variations

http://www.bukisa.com/articles/365530_traditional-and-cultural-african-homes-part-2